Cardi B always turns a look — be it day or night, 80 degree weather or sub zero. So it's no surprise the musician knows a thing or two about comfort levels and wearability while stunting in your favorite fits.

A new study published in the British Journal of Social Psychology analyzed Cardi's viral video claim that "a hoe never gets cold" and found that she may not be far off. "When looking 'hot' means not feeling cold, evidence [suggests] that self-objectification inhibits feelings of being cold." Or, "scantily clad women" are likely to feel just as bundled up on a winter's night out as those who are actually covered up.

The study was co-authored by six scholars — one of them being 25-year-old Roxanne Felig who posted about her research on TikTok, saying that it was inspired by Cardi's classic video. "We wanted to test that — scientifically — and so we did," she said. "And its' true. It seemed like what Cardi was saying was that she was too focused on how she looked and what she was wearing to feel cold."

This theory was tested by researchers who surveyed women as they stood outside of nightclubs on chilly nights, asking three questions: how cold they felt, how intoxicated they felt and how many drinks that they consumed.

Felig also explained how the results backed up what's known as "objectification theory."

Objectification theory posits that when women take an outsider's perspective of their body — so when women are highly focused on how they appear externally — it reduces the number of cognitive resources they have available to appraise their internal states," she said.

"So, when women are in a state of objectification, they are less aware of how hungry they are, their heartbeat ... They are just less able to recognize their internal states," she continued.

As the winter months loom, at least we can take solace in the fact that our looks don't have to suffer.

Photo via Getty/ Kevin Winter/ The Recording Academy

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