Caroline Calloway appears to be thriving. She's back on Twitter and has carved out a surprisingly enjoyable niche for herself as a chaos agent and self-parody account. Her manuscript for Scammer, the first of her two upcoming books, is reportedly complete and copyedited — though delayed with printers shuttered due to the coronavirus pandemic. Now, her highly anticipated "Natalie response" is here.

Or rather, a third of it is. Calloway has extended her rebuttal to her former friend Natalie Beach's viral essay for The Cut to include material from Scammer, making it long enough for three 15,000 word chapters.

Although Calloway says she's aware that "corona rly puts into perspective how dumb the sapphic plight of two white girls is," she's decided to weaponize the ordeal's viral power for good. She's posting one chapter on the website iamcarolinecalloway.com every week, starting today, and charging $10 for all three pieces to raise money for Direct Relief, a humanitarian organization currently securing protective equipment for medical workers and first responders treating COVID-19 patients. Anyone who donates $100 or more, will get a signed "Dreamer bb," one of her famous and controversial homemade collage artworks. "What's a Dreamer Bb? Matisse walked so I could fly," she writes on her website. The story is free for anyone who's lost their job because of coronavirus, or pre-ordered Scammer."

Calloway believes she's doing society a service in more ways than one. "Methinks we need some high quality tea to get us through these trying times," she writes on Instagram. Beach's essay famously uncovered her role as a co-writer of Calloway's Instagram account, the fact that Calloway purchased her first Instagram followers, as well as the generally sordid details of their fraught friendship. Calloway will be explaining her side of everything. Even, as she promises on her website, where those Yale plates went. (Good to keep in mind that while Beach's essay was professionally fact-checked, Calloway's is not).

According to screenshots, "I am Caroline Calloway" has already raised $10,000 for Direct Relief. Read on, tea awaits.

Photo via Getty

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