It gets clearer every day that the GOP is getting more and more desperate to secure funding for Trump's proposed border wall. The government shutdown is well into its fourth week with people getting angrier with each passing day and at this point it has become almost embarrassing to watch Republicans stoop to new lows to come up with the funds. Let's not kid ourselves, those hamburgers weren't a White House dinner, they were a cry for help.

Their latest inventive scheme involves a new bill introduced into the Arizona State House that would charge people a $20 fee to access porn on their computer. Called the "Human Trafficking and Child Exploitation Prevention Act," the bill would require that all devices connected to internet sold in Arizona to come with a pre-installed porn blocker that would require users to pay the government to unlock access to the adult content and punish distributors that failed to comply with a Class 1 misdemeanor.

The legislation isn't exactly new to those familiar with its architect. Motherboard reports that similar porn tax bills have been introduced in six states across the country thanks to anti-porn crusader Chris Sevier. Presumably the type of person that alerts a movie theater usher that you brought in outside snacks, some of Sevier's past exploits include trying to marry his computer as a protest against gay marriage and suing Apple for his crippling porn addiction. But even he has to admit that this is the first time he's seen the bill introduced with the aim of raising funds for Trump's border wall.

The brainchild of Arizona Republican Gail Griffin, the representative introduced the legislation into the Arizona House late last week detailing the proposed tax and outlining the formation of something called the "John McCain Human Trafficking and Child Exploitation Prevention Fund" where the $20 fees would be collected. It is not currently clear if the McCain family authorized the use of the late Senator's name for the fund, but what is clear is that in addition to being a massive freedom of speech violation the legislation is thankfully expected to be dead on arrival.

Photo via Getty

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