A new French bistro is rarely cause for celebration, especially one that looks like a poor man's Pastis with its wine bottles-as-decor accents. But what makes Pomme de Terre stand out is not only its food pedigree -- the latest project from the duo behind nearby The Farm on Adderley (Gary Jonas and Allison McDowell) and Jimmy Mamary, the owner of Patois -- but also the location. The Ditmas Park space was previously home to a grungy bodega and in February, a crime scene (two men shot at each other but neither died). Now it's a place where butter is churned in house, and the meat (for that classic steak frites, $19) is dry-aged on site. The quintessential French dishes are the most impressive, like a charcuterie plate piled high with four types of cured meat and country paté ($8), and a perfectly crisped, whole-roasted branzino ($17). The more creative stuff is less worth a 45-minute trip from Manhattan. The pastry-crusted ratatouille ($13) more closely resembles a burrito than anything to inspire a Pixar movie. Roasted tomatoes mask the duck in the smoked duck sandwich ($9). This is a place that's meant to breathe some new life into its 'hood, but don't expect the crowd to be as cool as the waitstaff just yet. 1301 Newkirk Ave., Ditmas Park, (718) 284-0005.