Next weekend is the second annual Pornhub and Adult Empire-sponsored NYC Porn Festival -- a wonderfully smutty affair filled with porn-centric panels, sexy art films and a virtual reality tech display that will provide exactly what you think it will (interactive porn). With screenings of things like the band Daddy's erotic music video, a new production from Internet favorite Amalia Ulman and, of course, a crazy afterparty hosted by none other than Ron Jeremy, it's likely to be one of the more salacious weekends you'll have this summer. As such, we decided to invite the mastermind behind the entire affair, Simon Leahy, into the office (alongside collaborator Jake Dibeler) to talk butt plugs, last year's Miley Cyrus incident and the private becoming very, very public. Read our Q&A; and get a sneak peek of one of the films (specifically the trailer for A.L. Steiner + A.K. Burns's "Community Action Center") below -- and, if it's got you all hot and bothered, buy your passes HERE.

Tell me a little bit about the ethos of the NYC Porn Festival -- like what are you trying to accomplish. How was the idea born?

Simon Leahy: Basically it's about the exploration of porn. I was really interested in how porn impacts human behavior and people's relationships because I was having quite a lot of sex. Not right now, but a few years ago -- all of these guys [I was with] were trying to be porn stars and I was like, "Chill, that's not like how people have sex." So this thought came to my mind and I was like, "What can I do?" So I did this festival. I was trying to show other sides of porn -- to mix "high-culture" [artwork] with so-called "low-culture" i.e. strippers, porn stars and other more mainstream, patriarchal porn. And then Pornhub was interested in sponsoring it, so that gave us a budget to work with and from there, things snowballed. But what was really interesting with the first festival were the different reactions from the people watching porn together in a room. And also, it was in a gallery, so watching Tila Tequila get fucked in the ass for twenty minutes was kind of elevated to high art.

Twenty minutes? So when you were kinda reading the room's temperature, it wasn't uncomfortable at all?

SL: No! Well I think it was for a few people. Some guy left and puked -- like he couldn't handle it. [But it wasn't like gross, lewd people or anything]. The only person to get thrown out was a woman, for getting fucked in the booth at the back. It was just an interesting climate of people that were kind of there for different reasons.

Well I feel like if you were coming to jerk off, that's kind of a fundamental misunderstanding of what your mission was.

SL: Yeah, for sure. But I definitely was also interested in bringing [together] totally different parts of society that don't usually sit together...

Right, and also making this really private viewing experience public?

SL: It's public, but it's for people in the room. This year, we're going to have a no-camera policy on some screenings. Basically some of the filmmakers are couples that have made porn and they'll show up but only if it's like [a no-camera policy].

Okay. So, then this year's programming is pretty insane, but if you were to pick a couple, what are you most excited for?

SL: I'm excited for Amalia Ulman's screening and some other really great artists that are a part of that -- and the financial domination video. This amazing dominatrix is called Mistress Dahlia Rain and she's bringing her slave with her. She's basically going to humiliate him and he's excited to come and be humiliated in front of so many people. She's doing a live performance and a panel that's going to contain a live web cam performance.

What other sort of multimedia installations are a part of the festival this year?

SL: Well for example, we have Pornhub launching their virtual reality technology. It's going to be a demo place. My friend is also working with this tech guy, and they are doing this live 3D-mapping project on naked bodies. It's going to be really cool.

What would you say you learned from last year's inaugural event?

SL: Last year's was literally thrown together out of boredom. So basically just [the need to] organize this one better--and there will definitely be more scandal. That's what I've wanted us to do.

More scandal? Even though the Miley Cyrus debacle, in which you had to pull an erotic art film she shot with Quentin Jones, dominated the conversation last year?

SL: Oh my God, that was so stressful. [I obtained the film originally from] my friend who was like, "Oh check out this film. She doesn't own any of the rights of this film." And I was like, "Yeah, as if we give celebrities the right to their own image." So then I asked the production company [if we could screen it] and the production company [said] "Yes!"...[But it wasn't cleared by Cyrus's team]. So I was getting on a plane to Tokyo and when I landed, it was literally a fucking shit storm -- I had her agent screaming down the phone at me, "What's happened?"

Watching the film, it wasn't that crazy.

SL: It wasn't even crazy. But I feel like people freak out at the word "porn."

What you are doing is kind of like an art film festival.

SL: Yeah, totally, and it's coming from that trajectory. But I do hope to switch it up and get some more porn stars to come through eventually.

Speaking of the Miley incident, that whole thing spurred a lot of criticism. What would you say to the people who say the second year is just another exercise in gimmick marketing?

Jake Dibeler: The people that see it as a gimmicky marketing thing...it was all user submitted, mostly queer, very feminist-based last year. People who are like, "Oh it's a gimmicky thing, you're stuck in the whole porn thing" are [dismissing what's really important], because the majority of the submissions are from trans people and women. So if you're not going to go and see how open-ended it is, then of course you're just going to be like, "Oh it's a porn festival, smut." But it's actually way more of a conversation and the panels that we had last year were really insightful and powerful. It's important. It comes off as like porn fest, we are showing people getting fucked, but it's really powerful.

I know that last year a couple of protesters decided to show up as well.

SL: Yeah, that was great!

Was it?

SL: Well, it was. I didn't heckle them. I freaked out because they brought shitloads of police. The police loved it [though]. And the protestors were good! I mean, the festival began a conversation. And it's really all about exploration, and if people feel the need to protest then they should and have the right to do so -- and join in on the conversation.

Splash photo by Christopher Olszewski