Last night's below-freezing temperatures did not deter us from hopping to and fro gallery to gallery and getting some visual vibrancy and heat back into our bones.

Our Thursday tour began at 547 W. 27th St., the home to some of the most dynamic galleries in Chelsea, two of which had shows opening last night. "Come to Me," at The Witzenhausen Gallery, is the first New York solo show for the acclaimed Dutch artist Margriet Smulders. Her photographs, depicting floral still-lives, offer a modern take on 17th-Century Dutch masters, oozing with sultry and seductive undertones. Throughout the opening, a strange gentleman was placing little pins into the wall, one of which read: "ART." 


Down the hall at the Bold Hype Gallery, the group show "Fracture" featured works from emerging East and West Coast artists. Kelly Allen's pieces stole the show; her pop and graphic elements meshed with nature themes were brilliant. The runner up behind Miss Allen was Chris Uphues, whose Japanese pop aesthetic was delightfully lighthearted.

In need of some art that was a bit heavier, we headed to SoHo's Team Gallery for Brice Dellsperger's, "RefreshingFassbinder... and others." And heavy is what we got. The French video artist's exciting yet equally disturbing imagery had us in complete awe. The two videos on display are part of an ongoing 28 piece oeuvre called "Body Double," in which the artist has recreated scenes from iconic films. If you think that infamous scene in Eyes Wide Shut could not get any creepier, well think again.

It was then onto LES gallery Artjail, on 50 Eldridge St. A packed, old-school freight elevator took us to the 6th floor, where "Hell on Fire," the first NYC solo show from the Brooklyn-based artist Anthony Michael Sneed was on display. Sneed has diligently been working for two years on this project; large-scale, colorful, subversive, 1980s video game- and Legos-inspired paintings. We're not his only fans; Shepard Fairy has included him in an upcoming show in L.A. at the Subliminal Projects Gallery.