Sexpress

The Femme Dominatrix Who Tortures Men For Money

Words by Justin Moran / Photography by Andrew Boyle

While Moschino's Jeremy Scott purveys gimp masks and full latex looks for Fall '18, BDSM runs deeper than mere fashion for New York's own MiscAllaneous DomTop. Not only is it a viable means for him to make money, but it's also a way to challenge stereotypes attached to the kink community.

As a queer man of color, who wears high-femme variations of sexy dominatrix style, MiscAllaneous considers himself an outsider — but one actively creating space for fellow marginalized people through his fetish burlesque variety show, Hard Core.

Ahead of the party's next installment on February 21st at Brooklyn's Bushwick Bizarre, we caught up with MiscAllaneous to learn more about their leather-laden practice.

Where are you from originally?

Born and raised in Southern California, I come from a very strict southern baptist church family of six. My parents were old-school, but very loving and caring. As far [back] as I can remember, I always loved to dance and entertain people; I have always had a big personality, and used to get in trouble from my mother because I would go through all her clothes dress up in them.

How do you identify today?

I'm just a sweet transvestite. I like to dress up in women's clothes and torture men for money — that's all. I was never hyper-masculine and never forced myself to act like one. I was made fun of as a child [and] my whole life, but I never let it hold me back. As I started to dress up, go out, and see how guys would look at me dressed up and what they would say to me, it gave me more confidence to keep doing what I'm doing. I would have never thought I would become a crossdressing dominatrix, but here I am today.

How did you develop your signature look?

My looks have always been very BDSM and fetish-inspired, so over the years its just has gotten stronger. I started out with just wearing a mask that always covered my face and I've kept that aspect ever since.

When you started wearing this look out, how did you notice people treating you differently?

When I am in my look, people treat me like a goddess and I love it. When I am not in a look, people treat me very different. I am often ignored and treated rudely most of the time. So it's funny, sometime I wear a look out and then I go out without a look (most people don't know what my face looks like), and I get treated like shit. It's sad, but true.

What's the story behind your name and how does it reflect your work?

The word (Miscellaneous) was one of my favorite words, and it can mean anything you want it to mean. I spell it differently because I was kicked off nstagram a long time ago, so I changed it to MiscAllaneous. The name DomTop was just for social media, but people kept calling me MiscAllaneous DomTop, so I kept the full name — and yes, I am a Dom-top.

What's your relationship to the larger BDSM community? Do you consider yourself involved? An outsider?

I will keep this short... I would say I am more of an outsider. But I feel like if I looked like "Tom of Finland," I would not be an outsider (and that's not a read, honey, that's a fact).

How did your Hard Core variety show develop?

I was asked by the owners of Bizarre Bushwick to do a monthly show. I said no at first, but then I met with them and said I will do one show. The first show was a huge success, so I said, "Let's do it monthly." Hard Core is every third Wednesday of each month. The next show is February 21st in Bizarre Bushwick at 10 PM.

What can guests expect to see at Hard Core?

My show is an anything goes show, but always with consent. Every HardCore show is a different show, but there's burlesque, boylesque, drag queens, drag kings, mistress masters, spanking, flogging, tickle torture , foot worship, trampling, sideshow performers. I book most of my talent from seeing them perform and [through] social media.

You've posted videos of you dominating men. How do you hope these will contribute to the greater LGBTQ conversation?

I post it them to show that you don't have to look a certain way to be a dom.

What's your relationship to NYC nightlife and fashion?

I feel very comfortable in NYC's LGBTQ nightlife. I only go to parties and spaces that I feel comfortable in. Fashion is a big part of aesthetic — I have a fashion styling background, so I make it a big part of my performance and looks. I feel so lucky to be able to have safe spaces that I am able to perform and be free in.

Photography: Andrew Boyle

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