While most young aspiring directors are figuring out a way to pay for film school, director Ray Tintori is finding out how to make film school pay for him. The 25-year-old New York native first gained attention when his undergraduate thesis film, Death to the Tin Man, received Honorable Mention at Sundance in 2007. Now he's best known for his innovative music videos for friends and Wesleyan classmates MGMT, as well as clips for the Cool Kids, Chairlift and the Killers. "The reason I wanted to make videos is to learn how to make things," he explains. "I'm not going to grad film school, but I'm still experimenting with this stuff. So every video is like a class assignment where I'm trying something new."

Tintori's desire to experiment and learn has lead to a surprisingly varied body of work, one that includes his early black-and-white short films and his bright, retro-futuristic work with MGMT. The avant videos for Chairlift and MGMT show Tintori using "a glitch in the system and exploiting it," finding ways to make the jagged edges of green screen or the beautifully liquid colors of a broken video file part of the process. Of course his next project -- stories based on 1930's -- style adventure serials -- is another left turn, and a chance for more on-the-job education. "It's a bunch of short films that fit together like a Rube Goldberg machine," he says. "I'll just have to go read history books for, like, five months now."
JESSICA SUAREZ

Ray wears a blazer by General Idea, shirt by D&G; and jeans by Cheap Monday. · Hair: Kiehl's Clean Hold Styling Gel

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