Jeanette Hayes is known for bringing together the oddest of couples through her paintings. She's done brilliant mash-ups of Picasso and Sailor Moon, the old masters and cell phone screens, and now -- thanks to Sprout by HP -- Jeff Koons shares space with a motocross derby. Below, we talked to the artist about how she creates her unlikely pairings.

It looks like there's a lot of different textures and materials that make up your collage. What exactly went into it?

Bikers images, a review from Artnews of the first show at the New Museum, a mood ring color key, a gun, a rodeo pic, a Koons [balloon dog] at Versailles, a "cool girl" sticker set, a LINE doll [making a kissing face], a bike winner image, painted brushstrokes, a little lens flare, and a little love. 

Does this piece have a name?

"Winner Winner Chicken Dinner"

It looks like the piece clearly has a beginning and an end. It starts with a motorcycle race and ends in a victory pose. What's the deal with the motorcycles?
 
I just like them. I like strong, usually male associated imagery, i.e. motorcycles, guns, trucks, rodeos, basketball stills, etc. I love boy art.

It looks like you hid a Jeff Koons balloon in your college. How does referencing other artists factor into your practice?
 
It's hard for me not to talk about [other] art when I make work because I spend so much of my life looking at it. Right now I just like making work about things I like. Contemporary (and historical too, to be honest) art is a huge part of that.

Your work usually takes something digital or contemporary and translates it into a painting, like your cell phone screen series. For this project you sort of did the opposite. What was your experience of using Sprout to paint?
 
I was seeing the brushstrokes more like line drawing marks -- just with thicker and thinner lines. I think of it as it's own thing, completely separate from traditional painting. I like making these "drawings" that are "paintings," but are also "collages" and overall they're just "art."

In 2014, what role does technology play in art?

Technology plays a big part in life in general, so I think it's hard for art to avoid technology -- and why would it?