It's getting hard to escape Taylor Swift since the release of 1989 -- in addition to conquering radio, she's also taken over the entirety of New York City. But even though it seems like whole world is swept up in Swift-mania, the music world has been quietly pumping out some amazing, non-Taylor Swift releases; from EPs to LPs to singles, we rounded up the ten releases in the post-1989 world that you should be listening to.

1. Grouper's Ruins

If you're in need of an album that will, uh, ruin you emotionally, this release by Liz Harris' solo ambient, dream pop project Grouper is probably your best bet. It's atmospheric and depressing, but in a way that's hauntingly beautiful. While it teeters the edge between experimental and pop -- as seen in tracks like "Holding" -- it will definitely stick in your mind after you listen to it.

2. BADBADNOTGOOD and Ghostface Killah's "Gun Showers (ft. Elhzi)"

The jazz trio BADBADNOTGOOD and Wu-Tang royalty Ghostface Killah might seem like an unlikely combination, but they've managed to create a song that's both atmospheric and aggressive. BADBADNOTGOOD sets the mood as both Ghostface and guest rapper Elhzi spit over the simplistic, jazz-inspired instrumental. The result is beautifully weird, but not entirely unexpected from the combination of so many great musicians.

3. Les Sins' Michael

The sounds of Les Sins are more dance-oriented than Chad Bundick's normal Toro y Moi release, but the side project retains the warm and likable heart that makes TyM so appealing. Containing almost no vocals but heavier and more experimental beats, the album sounds like a cool summer dance party, which is a great way to brace ourselves for the oncoming cold of winter.

4. Shamir's "On The Regular"

Shamir Bailey is only 19 but he's already explored his serious side on his Northtown EP. With his new release "On The Regular," he ends up with a song that is real charming and  perfect for those late fall blues you're trying to shake.

5. Ryan Hemsworth's Alone For The First Time

One of the most impressive things about Ryan Hemsworth -- other than his ability to consistently collaborate with amazing artists -- is his constant evolution as a producer. Alone For The First Time doesn't sound like his previous LP, Guilt Trips but it does manage to keep up his "sad bedroom producer who just needs a hug" aesthetic. While there's a definite sad vibe to most of his tracks, he keeps the light-hearted electronic touch we've all come to expect from him. 

6. Arca's Xen

As a producer, Arca has already made his mark by working with artists like FKA twigs and Kanye -- not to mention Bjork, whose upcoming album he's working on -- and now we get to hear a new side to the producer with his own release. The music is moody in a way that somehow manages to be inviting -- rather than off-putting -- and feels like nothing else that's out there right now, while still reminding us of the producer's megastar pedigree.
 
7. CHVRCHES' "Dead Air"

The new CHVRCHES track comes straight off the Lorde-curated Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part I soundtrack. It sounds very typically CHVRCHES -- soaring vocals over a bed of synths, aggressive lyrics, super technical musically -- so if you like this track or not really just depends on your emotions towards the band themselves.

8. Korallreven's Second Comin'


This Swedish duo's aptly named sophomore album is synthpop in its purest form: upbeat melodies with simplistic hooks and sugary beats.

9. First Aid Kit's cover of R.E.M.'s "Walk Unafraid"

First Aid Kit manages to put their own spin on the college rock classic "Walk Unafraid" for the soundtrack of Wild. As usual, the sisters spin a folksy masterpiece of chamber pop cellos and lilting guitars and maybe -- although it's rarely said -- make a song better than the original.
 
10. Ought's Once More With Feeling EP

Is this title a Buffy reference? We hope it's a Buffy reference. While perhaps not as universally endearing as Buffy, the Montreal rock collective Ought manages to be pretty damn endearing on their new EP. Between some soft sad crooning and aggressive yelling singer Tim Beeler speaks directly to his audience -- both literally and figuratively -- to really capture the beauty/confusion/anger everyone feels about being alive sometimes.